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GRANDSIRE DOUBLES - DEVELOPMENT

Today we would call Robert Roan's peal a 120. One forty-second of a modern peal. We would insist on casting our treble bell in the role of his hunt. Roan's half-hunt path has since acquired the curious name "observation bell", and is probably being followed by the ringer of either the 3rd or 5th.

Significantly, we now consider his method to be a combination of a plain course and lead-end calls. By varying the calls, we can re-arrange his method to create a wide variety of alternative touches. Roanís Grandsire would follow this modern calling (or a rotation of it):

	PBPBPS PBPBPS

Roan applied this structure to create a 720 of a new six-bell method which we now call Plain Bob Minor. Grandsire was later extended to become a highly musical method to ring on higher numbers of bells. This site, however, is dedicated to touches of Grandsire Doubles. One of first known alternative 120s (and its rotations) was originally named Gog and Magog:

	SBSP SBSP SBSP

St. Dunstanís Doubles is Grandsire including an alternative single change call, this time affecting Roanís half-hunt bell. Called as an "extreme", this it leads to three new (rotatable) callings structured like this:

	BSBE BSBE BSBE
	BSBE BSBE SSSE
	SSSE SSSE SSSE

Now, with rotations, "The Exercise" possessed 42 different 120s, enough for a modern 5040-change peal to use different callings throughout while keeping the treble as the hunt bell. More recently, a different form of the extreme appeared in a popular ringing book. Iíve termed it a bingle here to distinguish it from the "real" extreme.

Another fairly recent innovation, popular amongst some bands, is to ring longer round blocks. The best are the 240s that each contain every row once at handstroke and once at back. Morris published his 240 in the Ringing World in 1926. Ideal touches for Sunday ringing.

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Last updated 18th August 2002 by John Irving.