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GRANDSIRE DOUBLES - ROTATING TOUCHES

Many of the callings shown on this site can be rotated, resulting in a large number of potential touches. Rotation will always be possible unless the touch is of an odd-number length, such as a 99, which must be called as given.

Here is a touch of 240 changes, by Leslie W.G. Morris of Upton Snodsbury, Worcestershire, as published on page 827 of The Ringing World in 1926:

sssbssspsssbssspsssbsssp

To rotate it, we take one call from the end and put it on the beginning. We can repeat this process as many times as we desire, but of course we eventually end up back at the orginal touch. Here are all the rotations of the above touch:

psssbssspsssbssspsssbsss
spsssbssspsssbssspsssbss
sspsssbssspsssbssspsssbs
ssspsssbssspsssbssspsssb
bssspsssbssspsssbssspsss
sbssspsssbssspsssbssspss
ssbssspsssbssspsssbsssps

We have obtained eight touches from one calling in this example. Another reason to rotate is to make specific bells do specific work, for instance the choice of calling the 3rd or 5th bell as observation in one the standard 120s.


Last updated 30th March 2002 by John Irving.